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New Study on SARMs Reaffirms Need for Enforcement Action and Consumer Awareness

AIDP

On November 28, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), published a study online entitled, “Chemical Composition and Labeling of Substances Marketed as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs) and Sold Via the Internet.” In the study, researchers analyzed products that were labeled to be containing SARMs that are marketed on the internet.

The researchers found that the chemical analyses of 44 products sold via the internet as selective androgen receptor modulators revealed that only 52 percent contained SARMs and another 39 percent contained another unapproved drug. In addition, 25 percent of products contained substances not listed on the label, 9 percent did not contain an active substance, and 59 percent contained substance amounts that differed from the label.

In response to the study, the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) issued the following statement:

“We appreciate the work of the study authors in uncovering incidents of companies who put consumers at risk by illegally marketing products that contain SARMs, which are unapproved drugs, and are breaking the law by trying to sell them as dietary supplements. As the study authors have indicated, and as FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) has previously warned, products containing SARMs are not dietary supplements; they are adulterated, illegal, unapproved drugs,” said Duffy MacKay, ND, CRN’s senior vice president, scientific & regulatory affairs.

“We are committed to educate consumers to help protect them from these intolerable, fly-by-night companies who are engaging in criminal activity by bringing SARMs to the online marketplace. Further, we will continue to remind the dietary supplement industry that SARMs should not be used in their products. We have aligned with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and other dietary supplement trade associations in support of strict enforcement by FDA to rid the market of SARMs.

“It is important for consumers to understand that products containing SARMs are not dietary supplements and can be life threatening. Building muscle and enhancing athletic performance happens gradually over time and requires a multi-faceted approach, including healthy diet and exercise. Sports nutrition dietary supplements can play a beneficial role, and we strongly urge consumers to discuss their usage of these supplements with their doctors, health care practitioners, coaches or trainers in order to identify the best products to fit their needs.”

For more information, visit www.crnusa.org.